Posts By Scott Weiss, CFP

Will You Be Prepared When the Market Cools Off?

Markets have cycles, and at some point, the major indices will descend.

We have seen a tremendous rally on Wall Street, nearly nine months long, with the S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite, and Dow Jones Industrial Average repeatedly settling at all-time peaks. Investors are delighted by what they have witnessed. Have they become irrationally exuberant?

The Major Indices Do Not Always Rise.

That obvious fact risks becoming “back of mind” these days. On June 15, the Nasdaq Composite was up 27.16% year-over-year and 12.67% in the past six months. The S&P 500 was up 17.23% in a year and 7.31% in six months. Performance like that can breed overconfidence in equities. (1,2)

The S&P last corrected at the beginning of 2016, and a market drop may seem like a remote possibility now. Then again, corrections usually arrive without much warning. You may want to ask yourself: “Am I prepared for one?”(3)

TIP #1:

Are You Mentally Prepared?

Corrections have been rare in recent years. There have only been four in this 8-year bull market. So, it is easy to forget how frequently they have occurred across Wall Street’s long history (they have normally happened about once a year).(3,4)

The next correction may shock investors who have been lulled into a false sense of security. You need not be among them. It will not be the end of the world or the markets. A correction, in a sense, is a reality check. It presents some good buying opportunities, and helps tame irrational exuberance. You could argue that corrections make the market healthier. In big-picture terms, the typical correction is brief. On average, the markets take 3-4 months to recover from a fall of at least 10%.(4)

TIP #2:

Are You Financially Prepared?

Some people have portfolios that are not very diverse, with large asset allocations in equities and much smaller asset allocations in more conservative investment vehicles and cash. These are the investors likely to take a hard hit when the big indices correct.

You can stand apart from their ranks by appropriately checking up on, and diversifying, your portfolio as needed. Thanks to the recent rally, many investors have seen their equity positions grow larger, perhaps too large. If you are one of them (and you may be), you may want to try to dial down your risk exposure.

TIP #3:

Do You Have an Adequate Emergency Fund?

A correction is not quite an emergency, but it is nice to have a strong cash position when the market turns sour.

TIP #4:

Are Your Retirement and Estate Plans Current?

A prolonged slump on Wall Street could impact both. Many older baby boomers had to rethink their retirement strategies in the wake of the 2007-09 bear market.

TIP #5:

Consistently Fund Your Retirement Accounts

Finally, a deep dip in the equity market should not stop you from consistently funding your retirement accounts. In a downturn, your account contributions, in essence, buy greater amounts of shares belonging to quality companies than they would otherwise.

A correction will happen – maybe not tomorrow, maybe not for the rest of 2017, but at some point, a retreat will take place. React to it with patience, or else you may end up selling low and buying high.

Sources.

  1. money.cnn.com/data/markets/nasdaq/ [6/15/17]
  2. money.cnn.com/data/markets/sandp/ [6/15/17]
  3. fortune.com/2017/03/09/stock-market-bull-market-longest/ [3/9/17]
  4. investopedia.com/terms/c/correction.asp [6/15/17]
  5. This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Should You Borrow From Your 401(k) if You Need Cash?

Thinking about borrowing money from your 401(k), 403(b), or 457 account? Think twice. Here are 6 reasons 401(k) loans are a bad idea.

REASON #1
Damages Retirement Prospects

A 401(k), 403(b), or 457 should never be viewed like a savings or checking account.

When you withdraw from a bank account, you pull out cash. When you take a loan from your workplace retirement plan, you sell shares of your investments to generate cash. You buy back investment shares as you repay the loan.

So in borrowing from a 401(k), 403(b), or 457, you siphon down your invested retirement assets, leaving a smaller account balance that experiences a smaller degree of compounding. In repaying the loan, you will likely repurchase investment shares at higher prices than in the past – in other words, you will be buying high. None of this makes financial sense.1

Most plans charge a $75 origination fee for a loan, and of course they charge interest – often around 5%. The interest paid will eventually return to your account, but that interest still represents money that could have remained in the account and remained invested.

REASON #2
Contributions Could Be Halted

May not be able to make additional contributions due to outstanding loans

Some workplace retirement plans suspend regular employee salary deferrals when a loan is taken. They can resume when you settle the loan.

REASON #3
Potential for Docked Pay

Your Take-Home Pay Could Be Docked

Most loans from 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans are repaid incrementally – the plan subtracts X dollars from your paycheck, month after month, until the amount borrowed is fully restored.

REASON #4
A. May Have to Pay Back Immediately

30-60 Days: If You Quit, Get Laid Off Or Are Fired

This applies if you quit, get laid off or are fired. You will have 30-60 days (per the terms of the plan) to repay the loan in full, with interest.

If you are younger than age 59½ and fail to pay the full amount of the loan back, the IRS will characterize any amount not repaid as a premature distribution from a retirement plan – taxable income that is also subject to an early withdrawal penalty.1,2

Even if you have great job security, the loan will probably have to be repaid in full within five years. Most workplace retirement plans set such terms. If the terms are not met, then the unpaid balance becomes a taxable distribution with possible penalties (assuming you will not turn 59½ in the year in which repayment is due). If you default on the loan, the retirement plan may bar you from making future contributions.1

B. 5 Years To Repay

If Terms Are Not Met Unpaid Balance is Taxable

Even if you have great job security, the loan will probably have to be repaid in full within five years. Most workplace retirement plans set such terms. If the terms are not met, then the unpaid balance becomes a taxable distribution with possible penalties (assuming you will not turn 59½ in the year in which repayment is due). If you default on the loan, the retirement plan may bar you from making future contributions.1

REASON #5
You Get Taxed Twice!

Repay with after-tax dollars AND Taxed on withdrawals

When you borrow from an employee retirement plan, you invite that prospect. One, you will be repaying your loan with after-tax dollars. Two, those dollars will be taxed again when you withdraw them for retirement (unless your plan offers you a Roth option).

REASON #6
Why Go Into Debt to Pay Off Debt?

It’s Better to Go to a Reputable Lender for a Personal Loan

If you borrow from your retirement plan, you will be assuming one debt to pay off another. It is better to go to a reputable lender for a personal loan; borrowing cash has fewer potential drawbacks.

SMART TIP:

Your 401(k) Plan is NOT a Bank Account

Always remember, you should never confuse your retirement plan with a bank account.


Sources:

  1. cnbc.com/id/101848407 [9/14/14]
  2. mainstreet.com/article/why-you-cant-borrow-your-401k-and-only-way-you-should [7/24/14]
  3. This material was prepared in part by MarketingPro, Inc.

Market and Economic Update for the Second Quarter of 2017

It has been an awfully good year in most of the capital markets so far. Just like a great summer day with blue skies and bright sunshine, most stock markets have happily been rising and the economy has been chugging along. Bonds of many types have been profitable. We open our account statements and we’re pleased with the progress.

2Q.2017.Chart

The Economy Has Been Looking Good

From an economic standpoint there has been much to be cheerful about. Corporate earnings in the first quarter came in above expectations and sharply higher than preceding quarters. Unemployment is very low and while we haven’t seen a dramatic uptick in wages we are seeing what looks close to full employment. GDP growth continues to show positive numbers even if the pace of growth is somewhat slower than we would like it to be. Good things haven’t been confined to our shores either; Europe’s economy, in spite of Brexit and some tough election cycles, has continued to firm, China continues to grow, even with concerns about banking and debt, India and other parts of Asia show steady progress, and South American economies continue to improve despite the political turmoil in Brazil and elsewhere.

No Signs of Recession Yet

There doesn’t seem to be any sign of recession on the horizon as yet; the Fed continues to be both transparent about and circumspect towards the execution of rate changes. Our government is promising lower taxes and less regulation, items that can cheer even the most gloomy business owner.

So What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

It’s important to remember (or perhaps re-remember) that markets don’t move in a straight line, not very often at any rate. We’ve had 16 periods of downward market movement since the bull began running back in early 2009! It is entirely possible that we are ready for another, and we think it a useful endeavor to remind ourselves of this every so often. Bear markets begin when markets or economies get pretty far out of alignment and while we don’t think we’re seeing any of that right now, the garden variety market correction can strike at any time.

Planning & Diversification

As always, our defense is two-fold, good planning and diversification. In regards to the former, we sure don’t want to get too excited about stock market gyrations that concern money we won’t be touching for a long time; we know we can’t really time the market and we also know that over the long-term stocks tend to give superior returns in spite of that very same volatility. We also know we don’t want to have to eat our “seed corn” and so shorter term money should be invested in other areas.

What Will The Second Half of 2017 Bring?

We of course don’t know if the second half of 2017 will be as productive as the first has been. As mentioned earlier, we don’t think we’re on the verge of a recessionary time and that bodes well for the economy over the short and intermediate term. US stocks appear a bit richer than average, but that has been the case for some time and that modest overvaluation has moderated a bit in light of the robust first quarter earnings.

We’re also cognizant of the fact that reasonable investment time horizons are often greater than many folks’ attention spans and this can create volatility once someone in the proverbial theater yells “fire”! Watching that sort of “running for the exits” is always disconcerting. It is the age old story: we tolerate shorter term volatility for longer term performance; it isn’t always fun but over time it works exceedingly well.


Source:

  1. Prepared by LSA Portfolio Analytics

How Much Money Will You Need For Retirement?

What is enough?

If you’re considering retiring in the near future, you’ve probably heard or read that you need about 70% of your end salary to live comfortably in retirement. This estimate is frequently repeated … but that doesn’t mean it is true for everyone. It may not be true for you. Consider the following factors:

FACTOR #1

Your Health

Most of us will face a major health problem at some point in our lives. Think, for a moment, about the costs of prescription medicines, and recurring treatment for chronic ailments. These costs can really take a bite out of retirement income, even with a great health care plan.

FACTOR #2

Your Heredity

If you come from a family where people frequently live into their 80s and 90s, you may live as long or longer. Imagine retiring at 55 and living to 95 or 100. You would need 40-45 years of steady retirement income.

 

FACTOR #3

Your Portfolio

Many people retire with investment portfolios they haven’t reviewed in years, with asset allocations that may no longer be appropriate. New retirees sometimes carry too much risk in their portfolios, with the result being that the retirement income from their investments fluctuates wildly with the vagaries of the market. Other retirees are super-conservative investors: their portfolios are so risk-averse that they can’t earn enough to keep up with even moderate inflation, and over time, they find they have less and less purchasing power.

FACTOR #4

Your Spending Habits

Do you only spend 70% of your salary? Probably not. If you’re like many Americans, you probably spend 90% or 95% of it. Will your spending habits change drastically once you retire? Again, probably not.

Will You Have Enough?

When it comes to retirement income, a casual assumption may prove to be woefully inaccurate. However it doesn’t hurt to get a rough estimate. Using an online calculator link the one listed here can help you get started. You can use CNNMoney’s Will You Have Enough to Retire? calculator.

You won’t learn exactly how much retirement income you’ll need simply by watching this video and using the online calculator. But you will be on the right path. You may want to consider meeting with a fee-only, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ who can help estimate your lifestyle needs and short-term and long-term expenses


Sources:

  1. This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy.

JULY: 3 Things To Do This Month To Help Keep Your Financial Life On Track

Like maintaining a healthy lifestyle, maintaining a healthy financial life requires ongoing maintenance. It’s much easier to stay on track if you break the necessary tasks down into smaller more manageable tasks. So, here are three quick personal finance tips to help you stay on track this month:

TIP #1

Run a Retirement Plan Projection

Run a retirement plan projection so that you know where you are and what you need to do to get closer to your goals. You should do this once a year to see if you are heading in the right direction. For a quick calculation of what you need to be saving for retirement you can use this calculator at CNNMoney. If you need a more thorough calculation you should consider work with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ (CFP®). They’ll have access to more sophisticated software and will look at your entire financial life. If you are already working with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ (CFP®) you will want to revisit their projections at your annual review to account for changes in your finances.

TIP #2

Increase Your 401(k) Plan Contributions

For most people, setting a goal to max out your 401(k) or 403(b) plan contributions should be key. At minimum, shoot for at least contributing enough to get your company match. If you’re saving in a 401(k) or 403(b) and aren’t already on track to max it out, increase your contributions by 1%. Re-evaluate in 6 months and increase your contributions by another 1% until you ultimately max it out.

TIP #3

Review Your Investment Strategy

Has anything changed over the last 6 months that would cause you to have to make changes? Births? deaths? New goals? If so, review your plan or speak to your CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ (CFP®) to help you make smart choices.


Sources:

  1. http://www.learnvest.com/knowledge-center/your-january-2016-financial-to-dos/
  2. http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2014/12/02/your-end-of-year-financial-checklist
  3. http://www.forbes.com/sites/learnvest/2013/01/04/your-financial-to-dos-for-every-month-in-2013/#14fe6d3d41d4

Why A Well Diversified Portfolio is the Hallmark of the Savvy Investor

We all seem to know a day trader or two: someone constantly hunting for the next hot stock. That’s not what I’d consider smart investing. Here’s why it’s wise to diversify your portfolio:

Diversification Helps You Manage Risk

We all want a terrific ROI, but risk management matters just as much in investing, perhaps more. That is why diversification is so important. There are two great reasons to invest across a range of asset classes, even when some are clearly outperforming others.

REASON #1:

Potentially Capture Gains in Different Market Climates

If you allocate your invested assets across the breadth of asset classes, you will at least have some percentage of your portfolio assigned to the market’s best-performing sectors on any given trading day. If your portfolio is too heavily weighted in one asset class, or in one stock, its return is riding too heavily on its performance.

Your portfolio is like a garden. A good gardener will plant a variety of flowers to ensure something is always blooming. The gardener knows that some flowers eventually die off or may not grow well but if there is enough diversity the overall picture will still look good.

REASON #2:

Potentially Less Financial Pain if Stocks Tank

If you have a lot of money in growth stocks and aggressive growth funds (and some people do), what happens to your portfolio in a correction or a bear market? You’ve got a bunch of losers on your hands. Tax loss harvesting can ease the pain only so much.

Diversification gives your portfolio a kind of “buffer” against market volatility and drawdowns. Without it, your exposure to risk is magnified.

ADVICE:

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket!

Believe the cliché: don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Wall Street is hardly uneventful and the behavior of the market sometimes leaves even seasoned analysts scratching their heads. We can’t predict how the market will perform; we can diversify to address the challenges presented by its ups and downs.


Sources

  1. usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/perfi/retirement/story/2011-12-08/investment-diversification/51749298/1
  2. This material was prepared, in part, by MarketingPro, Inc.

6 Tips To Help You Begin (or Improve) Your Retirement Savings Plan

Feeling like you need to start saving and planning for retirement? Here are 6 smart tips to get you going:

TIP #1

Make Savings A Top Priority

Pay Yourself First

Resolve to pay yourself first. That is, direct money toward your retirement before you do anything else, like pay the bills or spend it on needs or wants. Always remember, your future should come first.

TIP #2

Invest Some or Most of What You Save

Potential to Grow and Outpace Inflation

Investing in equities is vital, because it gives you the potential to grow and compound your money to outpace inflation. With interest rates so low right now, ultra-conservative fixed-income investments are generating very low returns, and most savings accounts are offering minimal interest rates. Thirty or forty years from now, you will probably not be able to retire solely on your savings. If you invest your retirement money in equities, you have the opportunity to retire on the earnings and compound interest accumulated through both saving and investing.

TIP #3

The Effect of Compounding Can Be Profoud

The Earlier You Start The Better

The effect of compounding can be profound. Suppose you want to retire with $1 million in savings. Let’s project that your investments will yield 6.5% a year between now and the year you turn 65 and, for the sake of simplicity, we will put any potential capital gains taxes and investment fees aside. Given all that, how early would you have to begin saving and investing to reach that $1 million goal, and how much would you have to save per month to reach it?

How early would you have to begin saving and investing to reach that $1M goal?

START AT 45 = $2,039
START AT 35 = $904
START AT 25 = $438

If you start saving at 45, the answer is $2,039. If you start saving at 35, the monthly number drops to $904. How about if you start saving at 25? Only $438 a month would be needed. So, as you see the earlier you start saving and investing, the more compounding power you can harness.

TIP #4

Strive to Get The Match

Some Companies Contribute 50 cents for Every Dollar

Some companies reward employees with matching retirement plan contributions; they will contribute 50 cents for every dollar the worker does or, perhaps, even match the contribution dollar-for-dollar. An employer match is too good to pass up.

TIP #5

Invest in A Way You Are Comfortable With

Avoid Investments That are Convoluted or Mysterious

In the mid-2000s, some Wall Street money managers directed assets into investments they did not fully understand, a gamble that contributed to the last bear market. Take a lesson from that example and avoid investing in what seems utterly convoluted or mysterious.

TIP #6

Realize That Friends And Family May Not Know It All

Your Main Concern Should Be Staying Invested

The people closest to you may or may not be familiar with investing. If they are not, take what they tell you with a few grains of salt.

Getting a double-digit annual return is great, but the main concern is staying invested. The market goes up and down, sometimes violently, but there has never been a 20-year period in which the market has lost value. As you save for the long run, that is worth remembering.


Sources:

  1. This material was prepared, in part, by MarketingPro, Inc.

Market and Economic Update for The First Quarter of 2017

The year started with a bang as both US and international stock markets roared ahead in the first quarter. Bonds were much more muted as investors grappled with the potential upward nudging of rates by the Fed.

1Q.2017.graphic

The Markets & The Economy: A Look Back

As we pass the eighth anniversary of the turning of the markets and economy it is useful to look back and think about just how far we’ve come over that time. Things were looking pretty grim back in the spring of 2009 and almost all of us had been scarred in one way or another by the significant downturn in the economy that some call the Great Recession. On the business front some pretty big names had simply disappeared, tipped over into liquidation by that tumultuous series of events and families across the country were struggling to hold onto their jobs and their homes.

The Economy Today

Fast forward to today and things look a lot different. We have reached “full employment” and rather than a surplus of folks looking for work we now have many positions being unfilled. Businesses are healthy, the economy is chugging along and the stock market is breaking new records as corporate earnings move upwards and as investors increasingly feel comfortable with paying more for a dollar of earnings that they did a year or so ago.

Politics & The Market

It is an interesting time for certain. The change in the political landscape has been significant and markets and businesses have responded, seeing the potential for growth in the economy seemingly enhanced by the promise of lower taxes and less regulation. We’ve seen this most directly in the action of the stock market whose advance since the election has been robust but anecdotally we hear of businesses beginning to put capital to work and laying the plans for future expansion.

Future Assumptions

It’s important to remember that capital markets (stock, bond and other) look ahead and incorporate assumptions about what the world might look like 6 months or a year hence into the price movements of today. That market rise last quarter isn’t about what is so much as what will (or could) be. Should that vision of the future not turn out quite the way it might be expected to, then adjustments will be made in outlooks and be incorporated into the market levels of tomorrow.

Market Valuations

Over the long term, of course, stock prices are based on economic growth, the level of interest rates (as they set the bar for investment alternatives to stocks) and current market valuations, i.e. what investors are willing to pay for a dollar of current or future earnings. That last factor is a key one, and one that we employ regularly when looking at the relative attractiveness of the various components of our portfolios. Absolute valuations for the market as a whole (for instance “the market is too high”) are quite hard to make meaningful judgments about in the near and intermediate term as markets that are getting a bit pricey may continue to do so for some time and vice versa! We can however use relative valuations to see which segments of the market are starting to overheat or look very attractively priced and we review these data points on a continual basis as we think about constructive changes in our portfolios.

Looking Forward

Looking forward, markets will continue to be influenced by a number of economic factors. Corporate earnings are key of course and the direction of the economy is perhaps the major contributing factor to successful growing companies and to jobs and opportunities in communities throughout the country. So far so good on that score, we’re seeing continued economic growth coupled with low unemployment and the Conference Board’s leading economic indicators continue to point in the right direction.

Interest Rates

Interest rate increases, which folks expect more of this year, can have a moderating influence on markets in a number of ways but a measured pace of increases is not terribly worrisome as they reinforce the notion of strength in the broader economy. A significant difference over time in rates will also wiggle itself into the valuation equation however, which brings us back to, you guessed it, valuations!

What’s Next?

As we talked about earlier, trying to judge the valuation of the market as a whole is very difficult save perhaps in those times when valuations are near extremes of their range (think May of 2000 on the upper end and March of 2009 on the other end). Valuations have been creeping up over the last 8 years and we’re higher now than average certainly but perhaps not in the nosebleed territory as yet. These higher metrics could certainly provide, coupled with some other sort of economic uncertainty, an excuse though for the next market correction but that is just as it should be as market corrections do happen fairly frequently and their effects are naturally mitigated to some degree by our overall portfolio diversification.

In the meantime it’s spring, the days are longer and, thankfully, our televisions and computers have an “off” switch we can use to moderate the barrage of political and financial news that can be so unsettling at times. It’s the economy that will be the prime driver of the markets and the political parties have a lot less to do with that than one might be led to believe.


Source:

  1. Prepared by LSA Portfolio Analytics

3 Steps To Get Your Financial Documents In Good Order for Your Loved Ones

Wondering what paperwork you need have at the ready for your spouse or children so that when you pass you don’t leave behind a collection of mysteries for them to solve? Here’s what you’ll need:

 STEP #1
Create a Financial File

Function is More Important Than Form

Many heirs spend days, weeks, or months searching for a decedent’s financial and legal documents. They may even discover a savings bond, a certificate of deposit, or a life insurance policy years after their loved one passes. So, your first step is to create a financial file. Maybe it is an actual accordion or manila folder; maybe it is a file on a computer desktop; or maybe it is secured within an online vault. Clients of Weiss Financial Group can use their Secure Client Portal. The form matters less than the function. The function this file will serve is to provide your heirs with the documentation and direction they need to help them settle your estate.

STEP #2
Put The Right Stuff in The File

Your Heirs Will Need to Supplement the File

Now that you’ve chosen your filing system, it’s time to start putting the right stuff in it. Here’s what should go it in it…

Your Financial File Contents:

  • Your Will
  • Durable Power of Attorney
  • Healthcare Proxy
  • Trust Instruments
  • Insurance Policies
  • List of Financial Accounts
  • Usernames & Passwords
  • Contact info for your financial professionals

Your heirs will want to supplement your “final file” with contributions of their own. Perhaps the most important supplement will be your death certificate. A funeral home may tell your heirs that they will need only a few copies. In reality, they may need several – or more – if your business or financial situation is particularly involved.

STEP #3
Tell Your Heirs About the File

It Will Do No Good if Nobody Knows About It!

Be sure to tell your heirs about your “final file.” They need to know that you have created it and they need to know where it is. It will do no good if you are the only one who knows those things when you die.


Sources:

  1. This material was prepared, in part, by MarketingPro, Inc.
  2. marketwatch.com/story/13-steps-to-organizing-your-accounts-and-assets-2016-03-03 
  3. reuters.com/article/us-retirement-death-folder-idUSKBN0FK1RW20140715

How Much Can You Contribute to Your Retirement Plan in 2017?

A new year brings new opportunities to try and max out your retirement savings. Here’s a rundown of the 2017 contribution limits:

IRAs

For 2017 they remain the same as 2016: $5,500 for IRA owners who will be 49 and younger this year, $6,500 for IRA owners who will be 50 or older this year. These limits apply to both Roth and traditional IRAs. What if you own multiple IRAs? The total combined contributions cannot exceed the maximum allowed

401(k)s, 403(b)s, & 457s

Each of these workplace retirement plans have 2017 contribution limits of $18,000, $24,000 if you will be 50 or older this year. Now, If you are a participant in a 457 plan and within three years of what your employer deems “normal” retirement age, you can contribute up to $36,000 annually to your plan during the last three years preceding that “normal” retirement date.

2017.Contribution.Limits

High Earners

High earners may find their ability to make a full Roth IRA contribution restricted. This applies to a single filer or head of household whose modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) falls within the $118,000-133,000 range, and to married couples with a MAGI of $186,000-196,000. If your MAGI exceeds the high ends of those phase-out ranges, you may not make a 2017 Roth IRA contribution. (For tax year 2016, the respective phase-out ranges are $117,000-132,000 for single and $184,000-194,000 for married)

SIMPLE IRAs & SEP-IRAs

In 2017, the contribution limit for a SIMPLE IRA is $12,500; those who will be 50 or older this year may contribute up to $15,500. Federal law requires business owners to match these annual contributions to at least some degree; self-employed individuals can make both employee and employer contributions to a SIMPLE IRA. Both Business owners and the self-employed can contribute to SEP-IRAs. The annual contribution limit on a SEP-IRA is very high – in 2017, it is either $54,000 or 25% of your income, whichever is lower.


Sources

  1. This material was prepared, in part, by MarketingPro, Inc.
  2. fool.com/retirement/2017/01/17/roth-vs-traditional-ira-which-is-better.aspx
  3. money.usnews.com/money/retirement/iras/articles/2016-12-19/how-saving-in-an-ira-can-reduce-your-2016-tax-bill
  4. forbes.com/sites/ashleaebeling/2016/10/27/irs-announces-2017-retirement-plans-contributions-limits-for-401ks-and-more/ 
  5. fool.com/retirement/2016/12/19/457-plan-contribution-limits-in-2017.aspx 
  6. money.cnn.com/2017/01/13/retirement/ira-myths/