Retirement

Searching for Health Coverage in the Years Before Medicare

doctor pointing at tablet laptop

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

What are your options for insuring yourself prior to age 65?

If you retire before age 65, you must be prepared to address two insurance issues.

One, finding health coverage in the period before you can sign up for Medicare. Two, finding a way to pay for that coverage.

You know it will probably be expensive, but do you realize just how expensive?

A single retiree may pay as much as $500-1,000 per month for private health insurance. For a couple, the monthly premiums can surpass $2,000. These are ballpark figures; fortunately, seniors without pre-existing health conditions can locate some less expensive plans offering short-term coverage, albeit with high deductibles. (1,2)

If you find yourself in this situation, what are your options?

It is time to examine a few.

You could retire gradually or take a part-time job with access to a group health plan.

Ask your employer if a phased retirement is possible, so you can maintain the coverage you have a bit longer. Securing part-time work with health benefits elsewhere could be a tall order, as it may be much tougher to find a job in your early sixties; not all employers value experience as much as they should.

You could turn to the health insurance exchanges.

Purchasing your own coverage could be a first for you, and you may not be optimistic about your prospects at the Health Insurance Marketplace (healthcare.gov) or a state exchange. Your prospects could be better than you assume. As a Miami Herald article points out, a married couple younger than 65 earning around $65,000 could likely get a bronze plan for free through the Marketplace, thanks to federal government subsidies. A couple would be eligible for such aid with projected 2019 earnings in the range of $16,460-$65,840. For the record, the open enrollment period for buying 2019 coverage ends December 15. (2)

You could arrange COBRA coverage.

If you voluntarily or involuntarily retire from a company or organization that has 20 or more employees and a group health plan, that employer must give you the option of extending the health insurance you had while working for up to 18 months (or in some instances, up to 36 months). This is federal law, part of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) of 1985. (There is a notable exception to this: an employer can legally choose not to offer you COBRA benefits if you were fired due to “gross misconduct,” though the law defines that term hazily.) COBRA coverage is expensive: you effectively pay your employer’s monthly premium as well as your own, plus a 2% administrative fee. If you miss a premium payment by more than 30 days, your COBRA benefits may be canceled. (3,4)

You might be lucky enough to secure retiree health insurance.

Some employers do offer this to retiring workers; if yours does not, your spouse’s employer might. It is not cheap by any means, but it may be worthwhile. (1)

As a last option, you could move to another country (or state).

You could relocate to a nation that has either a universal health care system or much cheaper health care costs than ours does, either temporarily or permanently. If you decide to stay in that nation for the long term, you will really need to think about whether or not you want to sign up for Medicare at 65. Alternately, another state may present you with a cheaper health care picture than your current state does; a little research may reveal some potential savings. (1)

Review these options before you retire.

See how the costs fit into your budget. Have a conversation about this topic with an insurance or financial professional, because you may end up leaving work years prior to age 65.

JP-GTR-2018-30

▲ Rising annual health care costs in retirement

This chart illustrates the current range of total out-of-pocket health care costs experienced by today’s 65-year-old, and how those costs may increase over time. These costs include traditional Medicare with a supplemental policy. Supplemental policies, called Medigap, fill in gaps in Medicare coverage such as co-pays and deductibles. Part D for prescription drugs and out-of-pocket expenses are also included. Median costs are about $5,210 per person. Median costs are projected to more than triple over 20 years for three reasons: 1) higher than average inflation for health care expenses; 2) increased use of health care at older ages; and 3) Medigap premiums that increase not only with inflation but also due to increased age. It is important to note that these costs do not include most long-term care expenses. (4)

Sources

  1. forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2018/08/07/shopping-for-health-insurance-before-medicare-kicks-in
  2. tinyurl.com/yccclxmc
  3. bizfilings.com/toolkit/research-topics/office-hr/what-is-cobra-what-employers-need-to-know forbes.com/sites/heatherlocus/2018/10/21/what-you-need-to-know-about-3-key-options-for-health-insurance-after-divorce/
  4. https://am.jpmorgan.com/us/en/asset-management/gim/protected/adv/insights/guide-to-retirement

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

What Comprehensive Financial Planning Is and How It Can Help You

flat lay photography of macbook pro beside paper

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Your approach to building wealth should be built around your goals & values.

Just what is comprehensive financial planning?

As you invest and save for retirement, you may hear or read about it – but what does that phrase really mean? Just what does comprehensive financial planning entail, and why do knowledgeable investors request this kind of approach?

While the phrase may seem ambiguous to some, it can be simply defined.

Comprehensive financial planning is about building wealth through a process, not a product.

Financial products are everywhere, and simply putting money into an investment is not a gateway to getting rich, nor a solution to your financial issues.

Comprehensive financial planning is holistic.

It is about more than “money.” A comprehensive financial plan is not only built around your goals, but also around your core values. What matters most to you in life? How does your wealth relate to that? What should your wealth help you accomplish? What could it accomplish for others?

Comprehensive financial planning considers the entirety of your financial life.

Your assets, your liabilities, your taxes, your income, your business – these aspects of your financial life are never isolated from each other. Occasionally or frequently, they interrelate. Comprehensive financial planning recognizes this interrelation and takes a systematic, integrated approach toward improving your financial situation.

Comprehensive financial planning is long range.

It presents a strategy for the accumulation, maintenance, and eventual distribution of your wealth, in a written plan to be implemented and fine-tuned over time.

What makes this kind of planning so necessary?

If you aim to build and preserve wealth, you must play “defense” as well as “offense.” Too many people see building wealth only in terms of investing – you invest, you “make money,” and that is how you become rich.

That is only a small part of the story. The rich carefully plan to minimize their taxes and debts as well as adjust their wealth accumulation and wealth preservation tactics in accordance with their personal risk tolerance and changing market climates.

Basing decisions on a plan prevents destructive behaviors when markets turn unstable.

Quick decision-making may lead investors to buy high and sell low – and overall, investors lose ground by buying and selling too actively. Openfolio, a website which lets tens of thousands of investors compare the performance of their portfolios against portfolios of other investors, found that its average investor earned 5% in 2016. In contrast, the total return of the S&P 500 was nearly 12%. Why the difference? As CNBC noted, most of it could be chalked up to poor market timing and faulty stock picking. A comprehensive financial plan – and its long-range vision – helps to discourage this sort of behavior. At the same time, the plan – and the financial professional(s) who helped create it – can encourage the investor to stay the course. (1)

A comprehensive financial plan is a collaboration & results in an ongoing relationship.

Since the plan is goal-based and values-rooted, both the investor and the financial professional involved have spent considerable time on its articulation. There are shared responsibilities between them. Trust strengthens as they live up to and follow through on those responsibilities. That continuing engagement promotes commitment and a view of success.

Think of a comprehensive financial plan as your compass.

Accordingly, the financial professional who works with you to craft and refine the plan can serve as your navigator on the journey toward your goals.

The plan provides not only direction, but also an integrated strategy to try and better your overall financial life over time. As the years go by, this approach may do more than “make money” for you – it may help you to build and retain lifelong wealth.

JP-GTR-2018-4

▲ Comprehensive Planning

Planning for retirement can be overwhelming as individuals navigate various retirement factors over which we have varying levels of control. There are challenges in retirement planning over which we have no control, like the future of tax policy and market returns, and factors over which we have limited control, like longevity and how long we plan to work. The best way to achieve a secure retirement is to develop a comprehensive retirement plan and to focus on the factors we can control: maximize savings, understand and manage spending and adhere to a disciplined approach to investing.

Sources

  1. cnbc.com/2017/01/04/most-investors-didnt-come-close-to-beating-the-sp-500.html
  2. https://am.jpmorgan.com/us/en/asset-management/gim/protected/adv/insights/guide-to-retirement

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Is Generation X Preparing Adequately for Retirement?

man and woman sitting on hay

Photo by Oleksandr Pidvalnyi on Pexels.com

Future financial needs may be underestimated.

If you were born during 1965-80, you belong to “Generation X.”

Ten or twenty years ago, you may have thought of retirement as an event in the lives of your parents or grandparents; within the next 10-15 years, you will probably be thinking about how your own retirement will unfold. (1)

According to the most recent annual retirement survey from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, the average Gen Xer has saved only about $72,000 for retirement. Hypothetically, how much would that $72,000 grow in a tax-deferred account returning 6% over 15 years, assuming ongoing monthly contributions of $500? According to the compound interest calculator at Investor.gov, the answer is $312,208. Across 20 years, the projection is $451,627. (2,3)

Should any Gen Xer retire with less than $500,000?

Today, people are urged to save $1 million (or more) for retirement; $1 million is being widely promoted as the new benchmark, especially for those retiring in an area with high costs of living. While a saver aged 38-53 may or may not be able to reach that goal by age 65, striving for it has definite merit. (4)

Many Gen Xers are staring at two retirement planning shortfalls.

Our hypothetical Gen Xer directs $500 a month into a retirement account. This might be optimistic: Gen Xers contribute an average of 8% of their pay to retirement plans. For someone earning $60,000, that means just $400 a month. A typical Gen X worker would do well to either put 10% or 15% of his or her salary toward retirement savings or simply contribute the maximum to retirement accounts, if income or good fortune allows. (2)

How many Gen Xers have Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)?

These accounts set aside a distinct pool of money for medical needs. Unlike Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs), HSAs do not have to be drawn down each year. Assets in an HSA grow with taxes deferred, and if a distribution from the HSA is used to pay qualified health care expenses, that money comes out of the account, tax free. HSAs go hand-in-hand with high-deductible health plans (HDHPs), which have lower premiums than typical health plans. A taxpayer with a family can contribute up to $7,000 to an HSA in 2019. (The limit is $8,000 if that taxpayer will be 55 or older at any time next year.) HSA contributions also reduce taxable income. (2,5)

Fidelity Investments projects that the average couple will pay $280,000 in health care expenses after age 65. A particular retiree household may pay more or less, but no one can deny that the costs of health care late in life can be significant. An HSA provides a dedicated, tax-advantaged way to address those expenses early. (6)

Retirement is less than 25 years away for most of the members of Generation X.

For some, it is less than a decade away. Is this generation prepared for the financial realities of life after work? Traditional pensions are largely gone, and Social Security could change in the decades to come. At midlife, Gen Xers must dedicate themselves to sufficiently funding their retirements and squarely facing the financial challenges ahead.

JP-GTR-2018-13

▲Retirement savings checkpoints

Achieving a financially successful retirement requires consistent savings, disciplined investing and a plan, yet too few Americans have calculated what it will take to be able to retire at their current lifestyle. This chart helps investors to quickly gauge whether they are “on track” to afford their current lifestyle for 30 years in retirement based on their current age and annual household income. This analysis uses an appropriate income replacement rate, an estimate of how much Social Security is likely to cover and the rate of return and inflation rate assumptions detailed on the right to determine the amount of investable wealth needed today, assuming a 10% gross annual savings rate until retirement. It is important to note that this analysis assumes a household with the primary earner who plans to retire at age 65 when the spouse is assumed to be 62. If an investor’s current retirement savings falls short of the amount for their age and income, developing a written retirement plan tailored to their unique situation with the help of an experienced financial advisor is a recommended next step. (6)

Sources:

  1. businessinsider.com/generation-you-are-in-by-birth-year-millennial-gen-x-baby-boomer-2018-3
  2. forbes.com/sites/megangorman/2018/05/27/generation-x-our-top-2-retirement-planning-priorities/
  3. investor.gov/additional-resources/free-financial-planning-tools/compound-interest-calculator
  4. washingtonpost.com/news/get-there/wp/2018/04/26/is-1-million-enough-to-retire-why-this-benchmark-is-both-real-and-unrealistic
  5. kiplinger.com/article/insurance/T027-C001-S003-health-savings-account-limits-for-2019.html
  6. fool.com/retirement/2018/11/05/3-reasons-its-not-always-a-good-idea-to-retire-ear.aspx
  7. https://am.jpmorgan.com/us/en/asset-management/gim/protected/adv/insights/guide-to-retirement

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

The Risks of Putting Too Much Money Into an Annuity

women s in gray turtleneck sweater pointing white contract paper

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Although annuities can be a useful piece of a retirement strategy these private income contracts do have potential flaws.

It may not be good to have all your eggs in an annuity basket.

Or even a majority of your eggs, financially speaking.

Fundamentally, an annuity contract means handing over your money to an insurer.

In turn, the insurer pays out an income stream to you from that lump sum (or from the years of purchase payments you have made). The insurance company holds the money; you do not. From one standpoint, this arrangement has some merit; it relieves you of the burden of having to manage that money. From another standpoint, it has a few significant drawbacks. (1,2)

Annuities are often illiquid.

If you run into a situation where you need cash in retirement (a major home repair, a legal settlement, big medical expenses), do not expect to withdraw that cash from your annuity. If you have owned the annuity for some time, you may have to pay a hefty withdrawal penalty to access the money. From the insurer’s point of view, you are violating a contract. Should you have buyer’s remorse and decide you want out of your annuity contract soon after its inception, you will probably face a surrender charge. If you back out after the initial year of the contract, the surrender charge is commonly about 7% of your account value; it usually declines by a percentage point for each subsequent year you have spent in the annuity contract before surrendering.(2)

Annuities come with high annual fees.

A yearly management fee of 1.25% or more is not uncommon. Then there are mortality and expense (M&E) fees, fees for add-ons and guarantees, and up-front charges. If you have a variable annuity, throw in investment management fees as well. The “fee drag” for variable annuities may effectively eat away at their annual returns. (2)

Annuity joint-and-survivor income provisions may not be as beneficial as they seem.

Many annuities feature this payment structure, whereby the income payments continue to a surviving spouse after the death of one spouse. The downside of this arrangement: from the start, the income payments are less than what they ordinarily would be. If you are the annuity holder and you think your spouse may pass away before you do or are already confident that your spouse will be in a good financial position after your death, then a joint-and-survivor annuity payment structure may be nice, but not really necessary. (3)

If you do not yet own an annuity, consider that you may not need one.

The federal government basically gives you the equivalent of a deferred annuity: Social Security. Like an annuity, Social Security provides you with a reliable income stream – and your Social Security income is adjusted for inflation. (4)

Think of an annuity as one potential piece of a retirement strategy.

See it as a component or a supplement of that strategy, not the core.

JP-GTR-2018-48

▲Understanding annuities: Which annuity may be right for you?

Annuities come in all shapes and sizes, which can often confuse investors. This chart helps to identify the type of annuity that aligns to specific income needs and tolerance for investment risk, and provides information about how the annuity growth and payout amounts are determined, as well as other key characteristics to know.

Sources

  1. tinyurl.com/y9mukmp3
  2. annuitieshq.com/articles/annuities-good-bad-depends-actually
  3. forbes.com/sites/forbesfinancecouncil/2018/03/29/five-reasons-not-to-buy-an-annuity/
  4. ssa.gov/oact/cola/latestCOLA.html
  5. https://am.jpmorgan.com/us/en/asset-management/gim/protected/adv/insights/guide-to-retirement

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

If You’re at Or Near 50 here’s how to Catch Up on Retirement Saving

savings tracker on brown wooden surface

Photo by Bich Tran on Pexels.com

If you are starting at or near 50, consider these ideas

Do you fear you are saving for retirement too late?

Plan to address that anxiety with some positive financial moves. If you have little saved for retirement at age 50 (or thereabouts), there is still much you can do to generate a fund for your future and to sustain your retirement prospects.

Contribute and play catch-up.

This year’s standard contribution limit for an IRA (Roth or traditional) is $5,500; common employer-sponsored retirement plans have a 2018 contribution limit of $18,500. You should try, if at all possible, to meet those limits. In fact, starting in the year you turn 50, you have a chance to contribute even more: for you, the ceiling for annual IRA contributions is $6,500; the limit on yearly contributions to workplace retirement plans, $24,500.(1)

Look for low-fee options.

Lower fees on your retirement savings accounts mean less of your invested assets going to management expenses. An account returning 6% per year over 25 years with an annual expense ratio of 0.5% could leave you with $30,000 more in savings than an account under similar conditions and time frame charging a 2.0% annual fee.2

Focus on determining the retirement income you will need.

If you are behind on saving, you may be tempted to place your money into extremely risky and speculative investments – anything to make up for lost time. That may not work out well. Rather than risk big losses you have little time to recover from, save reasonably and talk to a financial professional about income investing. What investments could potentially produce recurring income to supplement your Social Security payments?

Consider where you could retire cheaply.

When your retirement savings are less than you would prefer, this implies a compromise. Not necessarily a compromise of your dreams, but of your lifestyle. There are many areas of the country and the world that may allow you to retire with less financial pressure.

Think about retiring later.

Every additional year you work is one less year of retirement to fund. Each year you refrain from drawing down your retirement accounts, you give them another year of potential growth and compounding – and compounding becomes more significant as those accounts grow larger. Working longer also lets you claim Social Security later, and that means bigger monthly retirement benefits for you.

Most members of Generation X need to save more for their futures.

The median retirement savings balance for a Gen Xer, according to research from Allianz, is about $35,000. A recent survey from Comet Financial Intelligence found that 41% of Gen Xers had not yet begun to build their retirement funds. So, if you have not started or progressed much, you have company. Now is the time to plan your progress and follow through. (3,4)

Sources

  1. irs.gov/newsroom/irs-announces-2018-pension-plan-limitations-401k-contribution-limit-increases-to-18500-for-2018
  2. businessinsider.com/401k-fees-devastate-retirement-2017-5
  3. fool.com/retirement/2018/02/07/heres-what-gen-xers-have-saved-for-retirement.aspx
  4. entrepreneur.com/article/309746

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

How the Sequence of Investment Returns Can Negatively Impact Retirees

silver and gold coins

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A look at how variable rates of return do (and do not) impact investors over time.

What exactly is the “sequence of returns”?

The phrase simply describes the yearly variation in an investment portfolio’s rate of return. Across 20 or 30 years of saving and investing for the future, what kind of impact do these deviations from the average return have on a portfolio’s final value?

The answer: no impact at all.

Once an investor retires, however, these ups and downs can have a major effect on portfolio value – and retirement income.

During the accumulation phase, the sequence of returns is ultimately inconsequential.

Yearly returns may vary greatly or minimally; in the end, the variance from the mean hardly matters. (Think of “the end” as the moment the investor retires: the time when the emphasis on accumulating assets gives way to the need to withdraw assets.)

An analysis from BlackRock bears this out.

The asset manager compares three model investing scenarios: three investors start portfolios with lump sums of $1 million, and each of the three portfolios averages a 7% annual return across 25 years. In two of these scenarios, annual returns vary from -7% to +22%. In the third scenario, the return is simply 7% every year. In all three scenarios, each investor accumulates $5,434,372 after 25 years – because the average annual return is 7% in each case. (1)

Here is another way to look at it.

The average annual return of your portfolio is dynamic; it changes, year-to-year. You have no idea what the average annual return of your portfolio will be when “it is all said and done,” just like a baseball player has no idea what his lifetime batting average will be four seasons into a 13-year playing career. As you save and invest, the sequence of annual portfolio returns influences your average yearly return, but the deviations from the mean will not impact the portfolio’s final value. It will be what it will be. (1)

When you shift from asset accumulation to asset distribution, the story changes.

You must try to protect your invested assets against sequence of returns risk.

This is the risk of your retirement coinciding with a bear market (or something close). Even if your portfolio performs well across the duration of your retirement, a bad year or two at the beginning could heighten concerns about outliving your money.

For a classic illustration of the damage done by sequence of returns risk, consider the awful 2007-2009 bear market. Picture a couple at the start of 2008 with a $1 million portfolio, held 60% in equities and 40% in fixed-income investments. They arrange to retire at the end of the year. This will prove a costly decision. The bond market (in shorthand, the S&P U.S. Aggregate Bond Index) gains 5.7% in 2008, but the stock market (in shorthand, the S&P 500) dives -37.0%. As a result, their $1 million portfolio declines to $800,800 in just one year. (2)

Here is a good chart from investmentmoats.com which helps visually explain what how early negative returns in retirement could potentially impact final portfolio value:

jlFIqYt

If you are about to retire, do not dismiss this risk.

If you are far from retirement, keep saving and investing knowing that the sequence of returns will have its greatest implications as you make your retirement transition.

Sources

  1. blackrock.com/pt/literature/investor-education/sequence-of-returns-one-pager-va-us.pdf
  2. kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T047-C032-S014-is-your-retirement-income-in-peril-of-this-risk.html
  3. http://investmentmoats.com/budgeting/retirement-planning/explaining-sequence-of-return-risk-and-possible-solutions/
  4. https://retireone.com/sequence-of-returns/

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

How to Balance Portfolio Risk and Reward as You Get Closer to Retirement

jeremy-thomas-75753-unsplash.jpg

As you approach retirement, it may be time to pay more attention to investment risk.

If you are an experienced investor, you have probably fine-tuned your portfolio through the years in response to market cycles or in pursuit of a better return. As you approach or enter retirement, is another adjustment necessary?

Some investors may think they can approach retirement without looking at their portfolios. Their investment allocations may be little changed from what they were 10 or 15 years ago. Because of that inattention (and this long bull market), their invested assets may be exposed to more risk than they would like.

Rebalancing your portfolio with your time horizon in mind is only practical.

Consider the nature of equity investments: they lose or gain value according to the market climate, which at times may be fear driven. The larger your equities position, the larger your losses could be in a bear market or market disruption. If this kind of calamity happens when you are newly retired or two or three years away from retiring, your portfolio could be hit hard if you are holding too much stock. What if it takes you several years to recoup your losses? Would those losses force you to compromise your retirement dreams?

As certain asset classes outperform others over time, a portfolio can veer off course.

The asset classes achieving the better returns come to represent a greater percentage of the portfolio assets. The intended asset allocations are thrown out of alignment.1

Just how much of your portfolio is held in equities today? Could the amount be 70%, 75%, 80%? It might be, given the way stocks have performed in this decade. As a StreetAuthority comparison notes, a hypothetical portfolio weighted 50/50 in equities and fixed-income investments at the end of February 2009 would have been weighted 74/26 in favor of stocks by the end of February 2018. (1)

Ideally, you reduce your risk exposure with time.

With that objective in mind, you regularly rebalance your portfolio to maintain or revise its allocations. You also may want to apportion your portfolio, so that you have some cash for distributions once you are retired.

Rebalancing could be a good idea for other reasons.

Perhaps you want to try and stay away from market sectors that seem overvalued. Or, perhaps you want to find opportunities. Maybe an asset class or sector is doing well and is underrepresented in your investment mix. Alternately, you may want to revise your portfolio in view of income or capital gains taxes.

Rebalancing is not about chasing the return, but reducing volatility.

The goal is to manage risk exposure, and with less risk, there may be less potential for a great return. When you reach a certain age, though, “playing defense” with your invested assets becomes a priority.

Sources

  1. nasdaq.com/article/how-to-prepare-your-income-portfolio-for-volatility-cm939499

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Why Medicare Should Be Part of Your Retirement Planning

person using black blood pressure monitor

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

The premiums and coverages vary, and you must realize the differences.

Medicare takes a little time to understand.

As you approach age 65, familiarize yourself with its coverage options and their costs and limitations.

Certain features of Medicare can affect health care costs and coverage.

Some retirees may do okay with original Medicare (Parts A and B), others might find it lacking and decide to supplement original Medicare with Part C, Part D, or Medigap coverage. In some cases, that may mean paying more for senior health care per month than you initially figured.

How much do Medicare Part A and Part B cost, and what do they cover?

Part A is usually free; Part B is not. Part A is hospital insurance and covers up to 100 days of hospital care, home health care, nursing home care, and hospice care. Part B covers doctor visits, outpatient procedures, and lab work. You pay for Part B with monthly premiums, and your Part B premium is based on your income. In 2018, the basic monthly Part B premium is $134; higher-earning Medicare recipients pay more per month. You also typically shoulder 20% of Part B costs after paying the yearly deductible, which is $183 in 2018.(1)

The copays and deductibles linked to original Medicare can take a bite out of retirement income.

In addition, original Medicare does not cover dental, vision, or hearing care, or prescription medicines, or health care services outside the U.S. It pays for no more than 100 consecutive days of skilled nursing home care. These out-of-pocket costs may lead you to look for supplemental Medicare coverage and to plan other ways of paying for long-term care.(1,2)

Medigap policies help Medicare recipients with some of these copays and deductibles.

Sold by private companies, these health care policies will pay a share of certain out-of-pocket medical costs (i.e., costs greater than what original Medicare covers for you). You must have original Medicare coverage in place to purchase one. The Medigap policies being sold today do not offer prescription drug coverage. A monthly premium on a Medigap policy for a 65-year-old man may run from $150-250, so keep that cost range in mind if you are considering Medigap coverage.(2,3)

In 2020, the two most popular kinds of Medigap plans – Medigap C and Medigap F – will vanish.

These plans pay the Medicare Part B deductible, and Medigap policies of that type are being phased out due to the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act. Come 2019, you will no longer be able to enroll in them.(4)

Part D plans cover some (certainly not all) prescription drug expenses.

Monthly premiums are averaging $33.50 this year for these standalone plans, which are offered by private insurers. Part D plans currently have yearly deductibles of less than $500.(2,5)

Some people choose a Part C (Medicare Advantage) plan over original Medicare.

These plans, offered by private insurers and approved by Medicare, combine Part A, Part B, and usually Part D coverage and often some vision, dental, and hearing benefits. You pay an additional, minor monthly premium besides your standard Medicare premium for Part C coverage. Some Medicare Advantage plans are health maintenance organizations (HMOs); others, preferred provider organizations (PPOs). (6)

If you want a Part C plan, should you select an HMO or PPO?

About two-thirds of Part C plan enrollees choose HMOs. There is a cost difference. In 2017, the average HMO monthly premium was $29. The average regional PPO monthly premium was $35, while the mean premium for a local PPO was $62.(6)

HMO plans usually restrict you to doctors within the plan network.

If you are a snowbird who travels frequently, you may be out of the Part C plan’s network area for weeks or months and risk paying out-of-network medical expenses from your savings. With PPO plans, you can see out-of-network providers and see specialists without referrals from primary care physicians.(6)

Now, what if you retire before age 65?

COBRA aside, you are looking at either arranging private health insurance coverage or going uninsured until you become eligible for Medicare. You must also factor this possible cost into your retirement planning. The earliest possible date you can arrange Medicare coverage is the first day of the month in which your birthday occurs.(5)

Medicare planning is integral to your retirement planning.

Should you try original Medicare for a while? Should you enroll in a Part C HMO with the goal of keeping your overall out-of-pocket health care expenses lower? There is also the matter of eldercare and the potential need for interim coverage (which will not be cheap) if you retire prior to 65. Discuss these matters with the financial professional you know and trust in your next conversation.

Sources

  1. medicare.gov/your-medicare-costs/costs-at-a-glance/costs-at-glance.html
  2. cnbc.com/2018/05/03/medicare-doesnt-cover-everything-heres-how-to-avoid-surprises.html
  3. medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap/whats-medigap.html
  4. fool.com/retirement/2018/02/05/heads-up-the-most-popular-medigap-plans-are-disapp.aspx
  5. money.usnews.com/money/retirement/medicare/articles/your-guide-to-medicare-coverage
  6. cnbc.com/2017/10/18/heres-how-to-snag-the-best-medicare-advantage-plan.html 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

What Do Rising Interest Rates Mean for You? (The Upside and The Downside)

dollar-currency-money-us-dollar-47344.jpeg

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Interest rates are rising.

The Federal Reserve has hiked the benchmark interest rate twice this year, and it expects to make two more hikes before 2019 arrives. It projects the federal funds rate will approach 3.5% by 2020. (1)

Are you retired, or about to retire?

You will be happy to know rates of return are improving on fixed-income investments. Take 1-year certificates of deposit, for example. Back in 2015, most of them were yielding 0.25%. Now their return is around 2.3%. Money market funds and even deposit accounts should soon feature slightly higher interest rates. The downside of this? If fixed-income investments grow increasingly attractive, investors may pull money out of equities. (4)

Do you have a lot of credit card debt?

The APR on your credit cards should continue to rise in response to the Fed’s moves. (2)

Do you have a fixed-rate mortgage?

You are unaffected. If you have an adjustable-rate mortgage, your payments may reset higher at the start of the next adjustment period. (3)

Are you a business owner seeking a short-term loan?

Try to arrange financing now. The cost of short-term borrowing increases when the Fed hikes. (2)

Do you own a business that sells high-end merchandise?

Your sales may be impacted. Higher interest rates force consumers to put more money toward debt. That means less disposable income to spend on the good life.

Sources

  1. bondbuyer.com/articles/fed-raises-rates-officials-boost-outlook-to-four-hikes-in-2018
  2. smallbusiness.chron.com/interest-rates-affect-businesses-67152.html
  3. tinyurl.com/y74tqh6q
  4. marketwatch.com/story/rising-interest-rates-give-retirees-good-news-and-bad-news-2018-06-20

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

What Women Need to Know Before Deciding to Retire: Challenges & Opportunities

thinking woman in white jacket and white scoop neck shirt blue denim jeans sitting on brown wooden bench beside green trees during daytime

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A practical financial checklist for the future.

When our parents retired, living to 75 amounted to a nice long life, and Social Security was often supplemented by a pension. The Social Security Administration estimates that today’s average 65-year-old female will live to age 86.6. Given these projections, it appears that a retirement of 20 years or longer might be in your future. (1,2)

Are you prepared for a 20-year retirement?

How about a 30- or 40-year retirement? Don’t laugh; it could happen. The SSA projects that about 25% of today’s 65-year-olds will live past 90, with approximately 10% living to be older than 95. (2)

How do you begin?

How do you draw retirement income off what you’ve saved – how might you create other income streams to complement Social Security? How do you try and protect your retirement savings and other financial assets?

Talking with a financial professional may give you some good ideas.

You want one who walks your walk, who understands the particular challenges that many women face in saving for retirement (time out of the workforce due to childcare or eldercare, maintaining financial equilibrium in the wake of divorce or death of a spouse).

As you have that conversation, you can focus on some of the must-haves.

Plan your investing.

If you are in your fifties, you have less time to make back any big investment losses than you once did. So, protecting what you have is a priority. At the same time, the possibility of a 15-, 20-, or even 30- or 40-year retirement will likely require a growing retirement fund.

Look at long-term care coverage.

While it is an extreme generalization to say that men die sudden deaths and women live longer; however, women do often have longer average life expectancies than men and can require weeks, months, or years of eldercare. Medicare is no substitute for LTC insurance; it only pays for 100 days of nursing home care and only if you get skilled care and enter a nursing home right after a hospital stay of 3 or more days. Long-term care coverage can provide a huge financial relief if and when the need for LTC arises. (1,3)

Claim Social Security benefits carefully.

If your career and health permit, delaying Social Security is a wise move for single women. If you wait until full retirement age to claim your benefits, you could receive 30-40% larger Social Security payments as a result. For every year you wait to claim Social Security, your monthly payments get about 8% larger. (4)

Above all, retire with a plan. Have a financial professional who sees retirement through your eyes help you define it on your terms, with a wealth management approach designed for the long term.

Sources

  1. cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db293.htm
  2. ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.htm
  3. medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html
  4. thestreet.com/retirement/how-to-avoid-going-broke-in-retirement-14551119

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.